The Making of A Thing.

.

.

A tale within the making of a thing.

.

Outside, it rained and rained.

And rained.

Photographs weren’t coming.

Inspiration was dry.

Desperate to make something by hand,

I sat and stared at papers, words, pens, paints.

I stuck some bits together, drew some lines…but nothing worked.

My hands felt grubby with glue and annoyed with the itch and no scratch.

But still nothing came.

A blank page.

Day followed Day.

.

I grew

<SCARED OF THE PAGE>

and

<ANGRY AT THE PAGE>

.

I’ve got very used to the impermanence of digital work.

Easy to rub out mistakes, go back to an old version.

I realised it was actually quite frightening to make something that I could potentially ruin.

Something worthless?!

Particularly as I was using ancient letraset and some beautifully printed, but torn, page-lost and tattered, old books.

.

I decided to just pick something that interested me from one of those lovely books.

As I looked through the pages, I found some really intriguing passages.

Some of these parts-of-books were from the 30’s, the 40’s, one from 1857!

I loved how each paragraph I leaned into threw seeds of a story to me, a time.

Crumbs of some unknown language, somebody else’s long dead thoughts..

.

I lost some time reading them.

.

I started to get interested

in what I could do with these things

make them live again

in new form.

I kept on ripping

Tear, Tease, Tear

I layed things out

paired intriguing chapter beginnings

with

some rubbed on letters

some scratched on lines..

and

before I knew it,

I had made something.

A beginning.

Relief.

.

12 thoughts on “The Making of A Thing.

  1. Your page (and also your comments) tell me that your project involved some serious fun:

    Perhaps you said it best:
    “Tear, tease, tear”.

    Hoping for some encores. πŸ™‚

    1. Hehe yes John it was fun in the end, playing with these incongruous lines..! sometimes it’s good to let loose on something..

  2. Made and printed in Great Britain – I love how that confirms something was indeed made – it is great to make a breakthrough!

    How you’ve written about the process is wonderful, and I enjoy how your word-scraps came together, Cath.

    1. Haha – yes, how proud that “Made in Great Britain” looks. It is slightly verging on lunacy this little piece but I’m sort of fond of it, thanks Karen πŸ™‚

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